Bayside Architectural Trail: Brighton Church Street

39 Black St, Brighton VIC 3186, Australia

Bayside Architectural Trail: Brighton Church Street

39 Black St, Brighton VIC 3186, Australia

36 m
2.9 km
Easy

This is one of eight architectural walks in a guide that can be viewed on a link to the Bayside City Council website in the walk Description..

Bayside Architectural Trail: Brighton Church Street

Report improper content
Rate this walk

Summary

This is one of eight architectural walks in a guide that can be viewed on a link to the Bayside City Council website in the walk Description..

Description

Find out more

The Trail is intended as an introduction to the variety of architecture on offer in Bayside.

Bayside is renowned for significant residential properties and distinguished public buildings that combine to make it an excellent location to view a diverse range of quality architecture.

Rate this walk

55688 Views


Points of Interest

1. Spurling House, 38 Black St (1888)

The Spurling House is the only known Melbourne design by Sydney based architect John Horbury Hunt, who was a figure of controversy in his time due to his innovative and daring new designs.

2. 7 Bleazby Ave (2005). John Tallis

The philosophy behind the corrugated iron is that it wraps the inside spaces, as if protecting the family, with the timber-clad forms inside this metal skin.

3. Heazelwood, 66 Wilson Street (1891)

Built as a residence for Brighton's Health Officer, Cornelius Casey M.D., Heazelwood was one of many Victorian era houses in the Brighton area to adopt elements of the Queen Anne style.

4. 26 Halifax St, Brighton (1878)

Robert Wright, a successful miner from the Ballarat goldfields, built the first stage of this house, then became bankrupt the next year.

5. 166-168 Church St (1890)

Rrumoured to be built for two sisters, there are only a few two-storey semi-detached residences in Brighton and these are a sophisticated example of the Italianate style.

6. 161 Church St (1885)

Built by successful Melbourne stationer Alfred Harston as a family residence, the house features a tower with a 'widow's walk' (the topmost lookout).

7. 167 Church St (1886)

Calabria's asymmetrical facade is emphasised by a two- storey cast-iron verandah containing Gothic motifs in its lacework. From 1900-07, Emma A'Beckett (1838-1906) lived in this grand house.

8. 76-90 Church St (1888-89)

Munro's Buildings consist of seven two-storey rendered brick shops, with a central laneway. The original shop fronts have all been altered, but the facades of the upper level remain intact.

9. 71-73 Church St (1912)

Brighton\'s former post office uses bold chromatic brickwork; the distinctive stucco and brick porch is unusual, with its strong position on the corner.

10. Former Congregational Church, 17 Black St (1875)

The former Congregational Church is a superb example of an Early English-inspired Gothic church expressed in bichromatic brick. Designed by Charles Webb and built by James Bonham.

11. 58 Carpenter St (pre 1859)

The first Brighton rate books are dated 1859, and no. 58 was already firmly established as a house and brewery. It is one of the few houses remaining that pre-date the rate books.

12. 37 Black St

Wyuna, one of Brighton's stunning villas, features a wealth of decorative detail, a return verandah, and projecting bay windows on two sides.


Features

Public Transport Public Transport
Historical Interest Historical Interest