Federation Hill birding hotspots

from Mcgaffins Road, West Wodonga

Federation Hill birding hotspots

from Mcgaffins Road, West Wodonga

Staff Pick
1 h
4.9 km
Intermediate

Sixty bird species have been recorded on this walk. It's a one hour medium-brisk walk on Federation Hill with notes about the birds you may see in the various habitats along the way.

Federation Hill birding hotspots

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Summary

Sixty bird species have been recorded on this walk. It's a one hour medium-brisk walk on Federation Hill with notes about the birds you may see in the various habitats along the way.

Description

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This one hour walk (moderate-brisk pace) contains a steep uphill section along Kangaroo Track. Walking in a clock-wise direction is recommended to avoid slipping if going down Kangaroo Track. It can be extended by taking the Sundew and Tussock Tracks instead of Kangaroo Track.

Sixty bird species have been recorded on this walk. The bird photos accompanying this map were all taken on location. Generally speaking you're more likely to spot smaller bird species on sections with denser vegetation e.g. Sundew Track and Kangaroo Track, as well as along interfaces with backyards.

This walking map was created by Lizette Salmon as part of a Parklands Albury Wodonga project supported by the Victorian Government through the Volunteering Innovation Fund. All photos were taken on location by Lizette.

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Points of Interest

1. Start and end - along the fire trail

Access this walk from near the intersection of McGaffins Rd and Drewett Rd. Take the fire trail that runs along the base of the hill. It's flat easy walking.

2. Wetland birds

This dam attracts wetland birds including ibises, cormorants and ducks.

3. Rufous whistler

From spring onwards you're likely to hear and see rufous whistlers in the stretch between this marker and the junction with Kangaroo and Junction tracks.

4. Nankeen kestrel

Look in the upper branches of the stag/dead trees either side of the water tank on the hillside for roosting nankeen kestrels. They're also regularly hovering in the sky here.

5. Yellow-rumped thornbill

Yellow-rumped thornbills are very commonly seen foraging at ground level along this whole section to Kangaroo Track.

6. Junction with bluebell track

Stick with the fire trail - you'll return via bluebell track on the return.

7. Red-browed finch

Large flocks of red-browed finches frequent this section, eating grass seeds or ducking for cover in backyard shrubs.

8. Spotted pardalote

You'll hear (and see - with binoculars) plenty of these stunning little birds in the eucalpyt canopies.

9. Scarlet robin

Look carefully in the bush towards the ridge line and you may find scarlet robins in the cooler months.

10. Rainbow bee-eater

For a brief window approximately late Oct-early November you may spot a small flock of rainbow bee-eaters in this location.

11. Wetland birds

Occasional wetland birds including white-faced herons can be seen near this dam.

12. Superb fairywren

Superb fairywrens are common along much of this trail, including this spot near the trough.

13. Double-barred finch

Double-barred finches were sighted here on two occasions in late May 2021 i.e. they're rare but you may get lucky.

14. Steep ascent

Kangaroo track is a steep ascent

15. Speckled warbler

Classified as 'vulnerable' in Victoria, the speckled warbler has regularly been seen in mixed flocks with thornbills. Sometimes they're bathing in puddles on the track.

16. Silvereye

This is one of several spots you may come across silvereyes.

17. Buff-rumped thornbill

Buff-rumped thornbills are often seen on or near the base of eucalypts. You might even spot their nests in the crevice/bark of trees.

18. Gentle uphill gradient

Continuing along carex track

19. Scarlet robin

If you're lucky you might spot flame robins in the winter months during this more open area.

20. Bluebell track

Take bluebell track, with a moderate downhill gradient back towards the fire trail and start/end point.

21. Gang-gang cockatoo

Listen out for the distinctive calls of gang-gang cockatoos, particularly in spring. They enjoy dining on the gum-nuts of the apple box eucalpyts on the ridge-line.

22. Black-faced cuckoo shrike

Black-faced cuckoo shrikes are regularly spotted in mature eucalypts along the ridge-line.

23. Australasian pipit

In spring you may flush an Australasian pipit in the tall grasses here. They'll often land on a nearby rock and spend time watching you.

24. Common myna

Oh no - the dreaded common myna was first spotted by the map author on Federation Hill in September 2021. They're an introduced species that's a real threat to native species.


Features

Nature trail Nature trail