Boardwalks & bridges at Bandiana

Whytes Rd, High Country Rail trail parking, Bandiana

Boardwalks & bridges at Bandiana

Whytes Rd, High Country Rail trail parking, Bandiana

Staff Pick
1 h
5.32 km
Easy

Experience the floodplain up close, thanks to extensive boardwalks. A short section of the High Country Rail trail that might surprise you. See the birds, hear the frogs & admire the wetland plants.

Boardwalks & bridges at Bandiana

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Summary

Experience the floodplain up close, thanks to extensive boardwalks. A short section of the High Country Rail trail that might surprise you. See the birds, hear the frogs & admire the wetland plants.

Description

A walk that will get take you into the heart of the Kiewa floodplain, from the comfort of bridges and boardwalks that trace the path of the former railway line. This walk is 2.6km each way to the suggested turnaround point.

Enjoy a chance to experience the floodplain without getting wet (do note seasonal closures, advertised at the trail start, should the water exceed the access points).

This walk is suggested as an out-and-back route, starting and ending at the Rail Trail parking on Whytes Rd.

If you have companions and vehicles, it could be a car-shuffle allowing you to just walk one-way. Or you might like to add to the walk and extend at either end of this route to enjoy more of the High Country Rail Trail.
A further alternative would be to start and return to the access point on Gullifers Rd.

The rail trail is earthen path, not paved, with a series of steel boardwalks and variety of bridges. It is mostly flat.

Code of conduct
For the safety of other users:
• Please keep left • No trail bikes or vehicles
• Wheels give way to walkers (mobility scooters excepted)
• Horses give way to all users • Respect private property
• Keep dogs on leash • Carry in/carry out

For more information:
High Country Rail Trail

If you'd like to explore more of the Kiewa River Bushlands, see this information on the Parklands Albury Wodonga website

This walking map was created as part of a Parklands Albury Wodonga project supported by the Victorian Government through the Volunteering Innovation Fund.

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Points of Interest

1. Start: High Country Rail Trail parking / maintenance station

A convenient place to access this walk. With off-road parking, bike maintenance station and information about the rail trail. Begin by following the rail trail towards the floodway. Finish here too.

2. Cross the floodway on the road edge.

Be aware of traffic and of course avoid if flooded.

3. Turn left to return to the Rail Trail.

The trail is pedestrian and cycle access only. This section of the trail follows Middle Creek towards the Kiewa River, passing farmland and under the powerlines. It's about 1km to the Kiewa.

4. Some safety notes

This section gets inundated when the river is in flood. Please visit another time if the trail is closed (signs at trail start). Also a sign here to remind us to be snake aware.

5. Kiewa River bridge

The first of several bridges on this walk as you cross the Kiewa River.

6. Sign: former trestle bridge

Find out about the railway trestle bridge, now gone, from this sign and photographs. Can you pick where it crossed the river?

7. Boardwalk begins

Keep your feet dry, even when the floodplain is inundated. Many community organisations, workers and volunteers have helped to build and maintain this boardwalk, opened in June 2016.

Find out more

8. Floodplain seasons

In flood the birds, frogs and wetland plants are abundant. You might like to sit awhile to look and listen. Even in the dry the river flats provide shade and shelter.

9. Distance markers

The markers here note it's 8km to Wodonga and 27km to Tallangatta.

10. Reeds and fairywrens

The reeds, Phragmites, alongside the boardwalk here are habitat for delightful small birds, including the superb fairywren. In breeding season the males are bright blue.

11. Water-loving plants

How many plants can you see growing in the water? Visiting in a dry season these plants might be all but invisible, yet in the wet they thrive.

12. This board walk section ends, trail rises onto levee

The former railway line used both trestle bridges and embankments to enable access across the river and floodplain.

13. Look around, look down, look up ...

From this raised vantage point there are views across the paddocks, into the water (in season) and into the tree canopies.

14. Trail descends, levee ends

As you walk down the short descent you'll see the next bridge, a wooden one.

15. Bridge

Slippery when wet!

16. River red gums don't mind wet feet

These trees seem tough - they can go months with their roots and trunk submerged and then months or years in the dry. Look how they hug the creekside.

17. Next boardwalk section begins

A slightly different material.

18. The locals might say g'day as you pass

Or they might be too busy enjoying the floodplain pastures.

19. Boardwalk section ends

Approaching Finn Creek

20. Former Finn Creek trestle bridge

The interpretive sign nearby explains the history of this bridge. Today a metal bridge straddles the creek to enable our passage.

21. Access to Gullifers Lane

The path to the left leads to a small parking area at end of Gullifers Lane.

22. Suggested turn around point

The trail rises again onto a levee. Look down the trail and see if you can be tempted to continue on. If following our route, turn around here and return along the same path, back to the start.


Features

Historical Interest Historical Interest
Local Treasures Local Treasures
Nature trail Nature trail
Lake, creek, river Lake, creek, river