Monuments and Memorials History Walk

Floral Clock, Queen Victoria Gardens, St Kilda Road

Monuments and Memorials History Walk

Floral Clock, Queen Victoria Gardens, St Kilda Road

Staff Pick
2 h 30 m
3.4 km
Easy

Learn about the first 100 years of colonial settlement through the monuments and memorials in the gardens including the Separation Tree

Monuments and Memorials History Walk

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Summary

Learn about the first 100 years of colonial settlement through the monuments and memorials in the gardens including the Separation Tree

Description

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Governor Latrobe had word on November 11th, 1850 that Royal Assent had been given for the separation from NSW of the Port Phillip District allowing for the establishment of Victoria as a separate colony. It was to be effective Ist July 1851. A three day holiday (12-15 November) was granted by the Mayor of Melbourne so that all Melburnians could participate. Celebrations continued with fireworks and processions of thousands of people from William Street passing over Princes Bridge to the grounds where Government House stands today and to Separation Tree.

Let us join them in their walk today. Along the way we will stop and learn about the other memorials and monuments that have been commissioned of Philanthropists, Royalty and the Directors of the Royal Botanic Gardens during Melbourne's first 100 years. Culminating in the Shrine of Remembrance that opened during the Centennial celebrations.

This is 3.40 km one way walk starting and ending on St Kilda Road that has access to trams and connections to Flinders Street Station.

I have allowed time in the walk to drink in the ambiance and enjoy the stops. So some may do this much quicker. A longer stop for lunch should be added for enjoying a picnic near the lake or the Terrace Cafe.

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Points of Interest

1. Floral Clock

The Floral Clock included on the National Heritage List in 2017. The timepiece was donated in 1966 by the watchmakers of Switzerland. 9 metres in diameter with 5,500 plants to create the clock face

2. Edward VII (Equestrian Statue) Monument

The design began immediately after the death of Edward in 1910. The Australian expat Bertram Mackennal was commissioned, the original quote was ?1867 but cost three times as much. Unveiled in 1920 .

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3. Queen Victoria Monument and Rose Garden

Born May 24, 1819 and died after 60 years on the throne in 1901. ?7000 was raised from public subscriptions and James White received the commission. Unveiled on Empire Day, her birthday in 1907.

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4. Janet Lady Clarke Rotunda

Lady Clarke was a philanthropist and supported women's causes. Upon her death a memorial fund was established and Herbert Black's design for a Grecian-style white marble rotunda won the competition.

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5. Pioneer Women's Memorial

The garden was initiated by the Women's Centenary council to commemorate 100 years of European settlement in Melbourne. Fundraising included sheets of remembrance that were buried under the sundial.

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6. Temple of the Winds

Dedicated to Lieutenant-Governor Latrobe who had selected the land for the Botanical Gardens in 1841 and was designed by the second Director William Guilfoyle. It's at the highest point of the gardens

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7. Plant House Cottage

Built as the Gardeners home in 1850 it is one of the oldest properties in Melbourne and is heritage listed. As Government Botanist von Mueller lived here 1853-56 along with his specimen collection.

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8. The Terrace Cafe

We are walking towards the Terrace Cafe for refreshments. There are toilets on our way and you could choose to have a picnic overlooking the lake.

9. Separation Tree and Resthouse 1850

The tree marks the site where Melburnians met on 15th November 1850 to celebrate the news that Victoria was to separate from the colony of NSW announced by Latrobe. It was a 400 year old River Red Gum

10. Gardens House (previously the Directors Residence)

Built in 1854 von Mueller would move in when he is appointed Director of the Gardens in 1857. It was Guilfoyle who introduced the eclectic mix of plantings to create such a picturesque garden.

11. National Herbarium of Victoria

Von Mueller was Govt Botanist in 1853. The first building 1860 and was demolished to make way for The Shrine. With money donated for the centennial celebrations the 2nd opened in 1934 - 1.5M specimen

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12. Shrine of Remembrance

The official opening on Remembrance day 1934 coincided with Victorian and Melbourne's Centennial celebrations. An international competition launched in 1922 and 2 returned soldier architects won.

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13. Macpherson Robertson Fountain

Sir Macpherson Robertson was a philanthropist and contributed ?100K to the centennial celebrations funding MacRob High School, MacRob Bridge, the National Herbarium and this fountain

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Features

Public Transport Public Transport
Picnic spot Picnic spot
Drinking water available Drinking water available
Seating available Seating available
Public toilets Public toilets
Historical interest Historical interest
Art and culture Art and culture
Nature trail Nature trail
Lake, creek, river Lake, creek, river
Park / Garden Park / Garden